Past Events

16 October 2005

The results of an open-ended exchange of research experiences, observations and reflections likely to lead to advancing our understanding of what works best (and what works less well) to re-shape traditional governance and government practices for accommodating and leveraging the new levels of human diversity around us will be presented.

05 October 2005

Dr. Brenda Milner, the first lecturer of the Series, will be presenting “The Many Faces of Memory”, an informative look at the varying facets of human memory. Dorothy J. Killam Professor at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), and Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University, Dr.

12 August 2005

The Royal Society of Canada (RSC) is hosting a “Meet the New Fellows” Reception.

SPEAKERS: Marie D'Iorio, Chad Gaffield, Paul Merkley, Michael Rudnicki

26 May 2005

Dr. Brenda Milner, the first lecturer of the Series, will be presenting “The Many Faces of Memory”, an informative look at the varying facets of human memory. Dorothy J. Killam Professor at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), and Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University, Dr.

19 May 2005

Dr. Brenda Milner, the first lecturer of the Series, will be presenting “The Many Faces of Memory”, an informative look at the varying facets of human memory. Dorothy J. Killam Professor at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), and Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University, Dr.

12 May 2005

It is timely to make available to Canadians the considerations that are relevant to the issue of symmetry/asymmetry. We are doing this by publishing a series of short commentaries over the first half of 2005.

02 May 2005

A meeting of the Royal Society of Canada's Institutional Members of southwestern Ontario.

01 May 2005

While the research is firmly rooted in the cautious pace of genuine scientific progress, the ethical debate surrounding stem cells — primal, undifferentiated cells that have not become specialized yet — is swelling at a fevered pitch. For people in the “pro-life” corner of the debate, the moral cost of stem cell research is too high to offset any potential benefits.

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